Can you do macro photography with a 50mm lens?

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Emilio Gorczany asked a question: Can you do macro photography with a 50mm lens?
Asked By: Emilio Gorczany
Date created: Thu, May 6, 2021 6:20 PM
Date updated: Wed, Jun 22, 2022 6:12 PM

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Top best answers to the question «Can you do macro photography with a 50mm lens»

Macro magnification and other lens options

It can actually be done with any lens but a 50mm will give you a 1:1 or true macro scale image. Long lenses will not give you as much magnification and wide angle lenses will give you more (28mm is about 3:1).

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It can actually be done with any lens but a 50mm will give you a 1:1 or true macro scale image. Long lenses will not give you as much magnification and wide angle lenses will give you more (28mm is about 3:1).

No, 50mm is a prime lens is used for portrait but if you want to use 18–55 mm as a macro photography lens so you can use it by cheap ring that is a reversal ring.This photo is taken by me , by reverse Ring. It's very cheap and awesome. But in this you have to be very close to subject.

You can even use a 35mm lens for street photography, architecture, product photography, and macro photography as well. Heck, use it for weddings too, like the one shown above. That means with just one lens, you can tackle virtually any subject that doesn’t require a telephoto focal length.

They’re pretty affordable and you can get them for $7-$8.When you put the reverse mount ring, you can simply mount the lens as you normally do. By doing this, you’ll get 1:1 magnification with a 50mm lens. If you want a bigger magnification, you need a wider lens: the wider the lens, the greater the magnification. But if you want to get even closer, you can introduce extension tubes. Extension tubes. Once your reverse mount ring is attached to the lens, you can mount it to the extension ...

Extending the discussion to using a macro lens for general photography, choosing your macro lens focal length takes on further importance. If you want to use the lens for everyday walkaround images, you could get something around the 50mm “Nifty Fifty” focal length.

If you have another lens in addition to a 50mm, you can put them both together to create a powerful macro setup. This technique, known as twin reverse lens or dual reverse lens, will work with any lens as the primary lens (attached to the camera and behind the reversed 50mm), though the longer the focal length of the primary lens the greater the magnification will be.

If you do need to capture group photos with just a 50mm lens, try to make sure everyone is close together. Step back as far as you can while not losing focus on their faces, and do not be afraid to split the group into a front and back section.

This may seem like an odd choice for landscape photography as wide angle and super wide angle lenses are the most commonly used for this, but don’t underestimate the humble 50mm lens. While wide and super wide angle lenses allow you to capture the grand, breathtaking views we all set out to shoot, there are some great advantages to using a fixed lens such as the 50mm for landscape photography.

We took a Tamron SP 90mm F/2.8 Di VC USD lens into the field to shoot everything from close-ups to broad scenics. Your macro isn’t limited to small stuff. The Face Of The Landscape. In traditional terms, the focal-length range from 80mm to 135mm has been considered ideal for portraits.

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