Photography Milestones

  • Kodak 1900 – The Brownie was released to the world. It was a cheap self-reloadable box camera.
  • Kodak 1901 – Kodak released the 120 film format.
  • Arthur Korn 1902 – He devised a technology to reduce photographic images to transmittable signals that were sent by wire to other locations.
  • Colour Photos 1907 – The Autochrome plate was invented and became a commercial colour photography product.
  • Kinemacolor 1908 – A two-colour process that was the first commercial normal colour method for movies.
  • Kodak 1909 – Announced a 35 mm “safety” motion picture film and this was discontinued after 1911 due to imperfections.
  • Kodak 1912 – Released Vest Pocket that was known as the soldier’s camera using 127 films.
  • Thomas Edison 1912 – He released a short life 22 mm motion picture format film.
  • Kodak 1913 – Released 35 mm panchromatic motion picture film.
  • Kodak 1914 – Released the Autographic film system.
  • Kinemacolor 1914 – The first dramatic feature film in colour is released.
  • Kodak 1922 – Created a 35 mm panchromatic motion picture film.
  • Kodak 1923 – The Cine-Kodak camera a 16 mm amateur motion picture format is released.
  • Xenon Flash 1923 – Harold Edgerton invented the Xenon flash lamp for use in strobe photography.
  • Leica 1925 – The 35 mm format for still photography. Was the first commercially successful 35 mm camera.
  • Kodak 1926 – Kodak released its 35 mm Motion Picture Film for duplicate negatives.
  • Disney 1932 – The first full-colour cartoon is made in Technicolor.
  • Kodak 1932 – Kodak released the 8 mm motion picture film, cameras, and projectors.
  • Film cartridge 1934 – The 135 cartridge was released, making 35 mm easy to use for still photography.
  • Becky Sharp 1935 – Released the first feature film made in the full-colour.
  • Kodachrome 1935 – A multi-layered colour reversal film.
  • SLR 1936 – Introduction of the Ihagee Kine Exakta 1, the first 35 mm Single Lens Reflex camera.
  • Agfacolor 1936 – Agfacolor Neu colour reversal film for home use.
  • Agfacolor 1939 – Negative and positive 35 mm colour film stock.
  • View-Master 1939 – The 3-D Viewer with its “reels” of seven small stereoscopic images.
  • Kodacolor 1942 – The first colour film that yielded negatives.
  • Holography 1947 – Dennis Gabor invented holography.
  • Rapatronic 1947 – Developed by Harold Edgerton for the U.S. government.
  • Hasselblad 1948 – The Hasselblad camera was released.
  • Polaroid 1948 – Edwin H. Land released the first instant camera.
  • Contac S 1949 – The Contac S camera was released.
  • Bwana Devil 1952 – A low-budget polarized 3-D film.
  • Leica 1954 – Leica M was released.
  • Pentax SLR 1957 – First Asahi Pentax SLR was released.
  • Scanned Photographs 1957 – The first digital computer acquisition of digitized photographs, by Russell Kirsch et al.
  • Nikon 1959 – Nikon F was released.
  • Optima 1959 – AGFA released the first fully automatic camera.
  • Instamatic 1963 – Kodak Released the Instamatic.
  • Pentax Spotmatic 1964 – The first Pentax Spotmatic SLR released.
  • MOS 1967 – Released the first MOS 10 by 10 active pixel camera.
  • Photomatrix 1972 –Photomatrix 64 by 64 MOS active pixel.
  • Fairchild 1973 – They released a Semiconductor which was the first image forming CCD chip.
  • Kodak 1975 – Bryce Bayer develops the Bayer filter mosaic pattern.
  • Steadicam 1976 – Steadicam becomes available.
  • Kodak 1986 – Invented the world’s first megapixel sensor.
  • Kodak 1992- Photo CD created by Kodak.
  • CMOS sensors 1993–95 – The Jet Propulsion Laboratory produces devices using CMOS.
  • Nikon 1994 – Released the first optical stabilized lens.
  • Kodak & Apple 1995- Kodak DC40 and the Apple QuickTake were the first digital camera for consumers.
  • APS 1996 – The Advanced Photo System (APS) is released by Eastman Kodak, Fujifilm, Agfa Photo, and Konica.
  • Philippe Kahn 1997- The first known publicly shared picture via a cell phone was by Philippe Kahn.
  • J-SH04 2000 – The first commercial cell phone with a camera was made by Sharp Corporation and released by J-Phone.
  • Twenty-First Century
  • AgfaPhoto 2005 – Production of Agfa brand consumer films ends.
  • Dalsa 2006 – Produces the highest resolution camera with 111 megapixel CCD sensor.
  • Polaroid 2008 – Polaroid announced it was discontinuing the production of all instant film products, indicating the growth of digital imaging technology.
  • Kodak 2009 – Announced the discontinuance of the Kodachrome film.

Fujifilm 2009 – Launches the world’s first 3D digital camera.Lytro 2011 – Lytro released the first pocket-sized consumer camera capable of refocusing an image. Lytro’s light-field camera was created with some fantastic features: Variable depth of field and refocusing, Speed, Low-light sensitivity, and 3D images.

The historical leaps and bounds that photography took in the twentieth century helped usher us into a new century that is booming with prospective innovative technologies in this sector. Photography has always been a pillar of support for the fashion industry and for centuries both worked pari passu. As photography took its giant leaps so did the fashion industry.

After the Second World War, the fashion industry underwent a dramatic change, and various new designers emerged. Fashion models became necessary, and models like Dorian Leigh, Suzy Parker, Jean Patchett, and Dovima became household names. These changes in the fashion scene brought about a similar change in photography, and some of the most popular fashion photographers made their mark on history.

By the mid-1950s, the sober style of photographers in the earlier decades gave way to a new breed that were more impulsive, and energetic. Leading figures in this new generation included Lillian Bassman, (American, 1917–2012), William Klein (American, born 1928), and David Bailey (British, born 1938). In the 1970s, social changes- especially feminism- had a profound effect on photography, fashion and the way women were portrayed. More female photographers like Deborah Turbeville (American, 1937–2013), Sarah Moon (French, born 1941), and Eve Arnold (American, 1913–2012), brought new attitudes to fashion magazines and publications such as Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue.